Strategic Thinking: Building & Sustaining Competitive Advantage

Today, the word strategy is ubiquitous across all modern industries. But a quick history lesson reveals its military origins, where the use of strategy literally changed the map of the world and was responsible for the rise and fall of many nations and its people. It rose out of the need to defend against one’s enemies. Fast forward from Sun Tzu’s The Art of War, written in 400 B.C., and we find powerful global forces at play—from fast-moving technologies to unprecedented growth in emerging markets—that require a different kind of strategic mindset to win.

Long term success is guaranteed only to those who define and execute a sustainable strategy for winning profits. The market aims to drive your profits to zero. It’s the job of the strategist to defend—and grow—into profitable territory.

Developed originally through the Tuck MBA curriculum, this course provides a set of practical frameworks for evaluating a broad range of strategic problems. An interactive, case-based approach equips participants with tools that lead to winning strategies. If you are a direct contributor or responsible for the strategic direction of your company, this course is for you.

STRATEGIC THINKING: BUILDING & SUSTAINING COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE - Certificate

Duration and Course Fee

    • Starts 18 Jun 2018
    • 2 Months
    • 2 – 4 hours per week
    • Course Fees USD 1200

 

Faculty

Andrew KingAndrew King
Professor of Business Administration

Tuck School of Business At Dartmouth

Course Highlights

  • Interactive Lecture
    100Video Lectures
  • Case Studies
    6Case Studies
  • Peer Learning
    10Discussions
  • webinar
    3Live Teaching Sessions
  • Assignment
    6Assignments
  • Caspstone
    1Capstone Assignment

CASE-BASED LEARNING APPROACH

  • Disney Pixar
  • Ryan Air
  • DuPont
  • Ducati
  • Kodak
  • Fujifilm
  • Tesla
  • eharmony
  • Shaadi.com

SYllabus

Key Concepts:

a) Porter’s 5 Forces framework to evaluate industry competition

b) Three main types of competitive conditions

c) The role of supplier and buyer power in determining value appropriated


Application:

a) Using the 5 Forces framework to evaluate industry competition

Key Concepts:

a) VRIN (Valuable, Rare, Inimitable, Non-Substitutable) framework for analyzing resources and
capabilities

b) Evaluating potential new market positions


Case studies:

a) Ryanair: How a small newcomer positioned itself to gain a competitive edge against
much bigger rivals

b) Ducati: How the Italian motorcycle producer built its turnaround strategy by leveraging
its unique strategic capabilities


Application:

a) Identifying your firm’s capabilities based on the VRIN framework

Key Concepts:

a) Organizing productive activity and organizational form based on:

– Transaction costs

– Comparison between ownership and contracts

– Comparison between firms and platforms

– Firm-platform spectrum


Case studies:

a) Disney-Pixar: Why Disney acquired Pixar Animation for a nosebleed price of 46 times earnings

b) Online-Dating (e-Harmony, Shaadi.com, Tinder, and TrulyMadly): Why e-Harmony has struggled
to gain a strong foothold in the Indian dating market


Application:

a) Analyzing where your firm is on the Merchant Platforms Spectrum and exploring opportunities
along that spectrum

Key Concepts:

a) The causes and impacts of creative destruction, and how it shapes a company’s strategy

b) Analyzing the threats to your business and how to respond to those threats


Case studies:

a) Kodak vs. Fujifilm: How Fujifilm was better prepared than Kodak to handle the threat of digital
disruption


Application:

a) Evaluating the threats to your firms, and how best to respond to those threats with a successful
strategy

Key Concepts:

a) Analyzing the transformation of firms from being just players to becoming rule-makers in their
field

b) Linking of climate change and sustainability to your business


Case studies:

a) DuPont: How DuPont used its regulatory strategy to transform itself from a player to a rule-maker
in the chemicals market


Application:

a) Evaluating whether your company faces an information asymmetry or a collective threat problem

Key Concept:

a) Integrating the ICONS framework to analyze existing companies


Application:

a) Using the ICONS framework to analyze Tesla

BENEFITS TO THE LEARNER

Intellectual Capital

Intellectual Capital

  • Global IVY Education
  • Rigorous and experiential curriculum
  • World-renowned faculty
  • Globally connected classroom: peer to peer learning
  • Action Learning: Learning by Doing

Brand-Capital

Brand Capital

  • Certificate from EMERITUS in collaboration with Tuck School of Business At Dartmouth

Social-Capital

Social Capital

  • Build new networks through peer interaction
  • Benefit from diverse class profiles

Career-Capital

Career Capital

  • Professional Acceleration through our enriched leadership toolkit
  • Learn while you earn
  • Get noticed. Get ahead.

Duration and Course Fee

  • Starts 18 Jun 2018
  • 2 Months
  • 2 – 4 hours per week
  • Course Fees USD 1200

Faculty

Andrew King
Andrew King
Professor of Business Administration

Tuck School of Business At Dartmouth

Duration and Course Fee

    • Starts 18 Jun 2018
    • 2 Months
    • 2 – 4 hours per week
    • Course Fees USD 1200

 

Faculty

Andrew KingAndrew King
Professor of Business Administration

Tuck School of Business At Dartmouth

Other Programs

Global Ivy Emeritus Institute of Management